Georgia Guidestones Demolished Following Explosion

The mysterious granite monument Georgia Guidestones was demolished Wednesday evening following an explosion earlier in the day that destroyed a portion of the statue.

The controversial monument, also known as the “Satanic Guidestones,” was located 90 miles east of Atlanta.

According to investigators, the monolith panels were vandalized by an explosion around 4:00 a.m. Wednesday morning.

“A large portion of the structure” was destroyed when authorities arrived on the scene, per 11 Alive.

Later in the afternoon, the GBI announced that crews had demolished the rest of the structure “[f]or safety reasons.”

The 19-foot-high granite tourist attraction in Elberton — which the state says is known as “America’s Stonehenge” — was damaged early Wednesday after “unknown individuals detonated an explosive device,” according to the Georgia Bureau of Investigation (GBI).

“For safety reasons, the structure has been completely demolished,” the GBI later said while releasing the videos which show the blast and a silver car fleeing the scene.

Georgia’s tourism website says the monument “displays a 10-part message espousing the conservation of mankind and future generations in 12 languages.”

The monument was erected in 1980, built from local granite, by an unknown individual or group who went by the pseudonym “R.C. Christian,” the Associated Press (AP) reported.

Different reports vary as to how tall the stones stand, although Christopher Kubas, Executive Vice President of the Elberton Granite Association, said they did stand at “16 feet and 4 inches tall,” WYFF 4 reported.

Kubas noted they “weighed about 42,000 pounds each.”

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The Guidestones — before they were demolished — featured instructional writings that appeared to support population control, eugenics, and global governance.

Examples of writings that were on the stones include, “Maintain humanity under 500,000,000 in perpetual balance with nature,” “Guide reproduction wisely — improving fitness and diversity,” and “Let all nations rule internally resolving external disputes in a world court,” according to Smithsonian.com.

As footage began circulating on social media of the stones being demolished by crews, some users expressed their approval of the stone’s flattening.

Conservative social media influencer Ian Miles Cheong tweeted a video of the Guidestones being demolished, saying, “You love to see it.”

While some referred to the former stones as “America’s Stonehenge,” others viewed the stones as “Satanic,” the AP noted.

The attraction gained renewed attention in May when Kandiss Taylor, a Republican candidate for governor, claimed the stones were satanic and included destroying them as part of her platform, according to the Associated Press.

“God is God all by Himself,” Taylor tweeted in response to reports the monument had been destroyed.

“He can do ANYTHING He wants to do.

“That includes striking down Satanic Guidestones.”

As of Thursday, the motive behind the explosion – and who is responsible for the damage – was not immediately clear.

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By Frank Bergman

Frank Bergman is a political/economic journalist living on the east coast. Aside from news reporting, Bergman also conducts interviews with researchers and material experts and investigates influential individuals and organizations in the sociopolitical world.

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